Tag Archives: video

Media, Mexico, and tools for development

As people from around the world meet in New York to discuss the goals and how to reach them, we can’t forget the importance of media.

Of all the 8 goals, on 6.3 makes any reference to knowledge (Proportion of population aged 15-24 years with comprehensive correct knowledge of HIV/AIDS). Media and communications certainly play a huge role in achieving this important indicator.

But media plays other, very vital roles in a region, especially in democratic systems. Disappointing news out of Mexico over the weekend highlights the need and importance of a free and developed media system.

Mexican flag, depicted with a spray of bullets and a slain eagleMexico is one of the world’s most dangerous places to be a journalist, and editors at El Diario de Juarez seem to have given up.

On Sunday’s front page of this prominent Mexican daily, is the headline, “What do you want from us?” The headline is directed at the regions active and deadly drug cartels, who have killed the second journalist from that newspaper in a s many years. El Diario is just the latest newspaper to bow to violent pressure from the cartels. Further evidence, according to some, that the Mexican government has no control.

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, more than 30 journalists or members of the media have either been killed or have disappeared since December 2006. CPJ contributors Carlos Lauria and Mike O’Connor wrote a special report earlier this month. You can also see what its like to be a crime reporter in Juarez in this short video, Silence or Death (Spanish with English subtitles):

Silencio o Muerte from Dana Chivvis on Vimeo.

Teachers.tv

Here’s an interesting resource for teachers. It comes out of England, but its website makes the resources accessible to anyone with an internet connection.

Teachers.tv logoTeachers.tv is both a television channel and a website with videos, practical resources and an online community for anyone working in a school.

The videos are excellent quality, shot by the internationally acclaimed documentary production company, Brook Lapping.

There are plenty of sites out there with lesson plans, classroom management techniques, etc. But most of the one’s I’ve seen have a subscription fee for the good stuff. Teachers.tv (as far as I can tell) is completely free.They can be viewed on the site, downloaded and are now available on iTunesU.

Note: Some videos that air on the television channel do not have licensing for international streaming, so if you are outside the UK and looking for videos, the TV guide isn’t the best place to start.

Digitizing books, one word at a time

(Thanks to Marty Kearns from Green Media Toolshed and Netcentric Campaigns for bringing this to my attention!)

The need to digitize books goes beyond being able to put them on your Kindle. People with various disabilities (not just sight-related) use on screen readers and other audio tools for school, work and pleasure. But the availability of books in digital format can be limited.

In this very interesting video, Carnegie Mellon University professor Luis von Ahn explains how he is using the brain power of you and me to help digitize books, one word at a time, through a program he calls ReCaptcha.

Can social marketing reduce stigma?

This was one of the questions I addressed in my masters thesis this past summer. Specifically, I wanted to explore how different cultural interpretations of disability would affect communication efforts to reduce stigma in developing countries. More on that later.

As I was doing research, I came across a very interesting campaign from Scotland. The tagline is “See Me,” and they have lots of interesting uses of media in their campaign. In addition to tv and radio ads, they have photography contests, polls and downloadable curriculum packs. They also have a great collection of evaluation tools.

Each TV ad has a very clear target audience in mind, whether children or adults, the ads are aimed a people who know someone affected by mental illness. Take a look:

For children-

For adults-

(My favorite line from this one is, “Patterns change, friends don’t”)

(This one has some great brotherly ribbing, showing how their relationship didn’t change as a result of the mental illness)

Its the subtleties that I appreciate most in the ads for the adults. The ones aimed at children are clear and hopefully incite some empathy and understanding….

What do you think? Do you have some examples of stigma reduction social marketing that you found particularly good. Or bad?

AARP catches the youth, hope train

Osocio is one of my favorite blogs to follow- they always have great examples of social marketing campaigns from around the world.

This one, is from AARP- The American Association of Retired Persons, and its a product of their “U@50” video contest. (Getting young people to think about retirement is a tall order! Kudos to AARP for their Youtube contest. You can see the winners here.)

The play on words is great, and evidentally its based on an Argentinian election campaign ad by Lopez Murphy. He didn’t win, but his ad won the Silver Lion at the Cannes Lion Contest in 2006! (small consolation, I’m sure)

How to get people talking about condoms, in 4 easy steps!

The BBC World Trust is wrapping up a large public health campaign in India in an effort to curb HIV infections. The year long multimedia campaign began in December 2007 and has been running in 4 states. Its objective is to “make condoms more socially acceptable and improve the image of the condom user as a smart and responsible person.”

The campaign included four stages:

Stage 1- A Contest

A riddle was  distributed (via radio, tv, billboards and buses, etc) and people were encouraged to call in with their answer. Then one of the people with the correct answer would win a free cell phone with paid air time!

Nearly 400,000 calls were made by people attempting to answer the riddle, and 25 winners were randomly selected and won a camera phone with paid talk time. According to the BBC World Trust’s impact evaluation of the phase, the campaign reached 52 million men in just 3 weeks.

Stage 2- Changing sport

The second phase of this campaign came in the form of tv, radio and print ads, which integrated local culture with the message. The ads depict a kabaddi match, a team sport where chanting the word “kabaddi” during play is part of the game. In the ad, our hero wins the match by chanting “condom” instead of “kabaddi.” The ad also places more emphasis on an animated parrot, who appears throughout the campaign.

Stage 3- Ringtone

The objective of this phase was to show social support for condoms, and it used a “condom a cappella” ringtone to do it! The ringtone can be downloaded for free on the CondomCondom.org website or through an SMS shortcode in India, and it was promoted through several platforms incuding websties, online games, mobile advertising, as well as tv and radio ads. So far more than 675,000 download requests have been processed, and the website has received over 3.5 million hits. The tagline “the one who understands is a winner” is further reinforced in this phase.

Stage 4- What’s in a name?

This final phase comes in the form of a tv ad (on both broadcast television and in cinemas), and introduces a puppy named…what else? Condom.

The campaign ends this month, but already its producers say it has reached over 100 million men and women in India. A full impact evaluation report will be available in mid-2009.

Using humor in video advocacy

Its no secret that using humor in your online videos is a good strategy. But sometimes its hard to figure out how to incorporate humor into issues that aren’t funny – like human rights. Its a balance that nonprofit organizations have to strike all the time.

Here is a video that made me laugh out loud – and it turned out to be from a major human rights organization!

Enjoy!

Online Video Distribution for researchers

While searching for a different Ted Talk, I came across this one. It is a fascinating example of how technology can be adapted for different purposes. But I love that in the end the speaker, Johnny Lee, credits online video distribution for the spread of his product. It only took 5 months to go from prototype in his lab to a major commercial product.

Now, to find the kids’ Wii remotes and start tinkering….

Public access and grassroots video

I’m attending a lecture today given by DeeDee Halleck, an expert in public access television programing and the use of communications in grassroots development.

You can follow along here.

Breaking up with advertisers

I came across this while doing some research for work.
What a fun way to show how media and our relationship with it is changing! This is specifically about advertising, but nonprofits should pay attention, too, since their outreach methods need to change as well.